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9 reasons to QUIT SOCIAL MEDIA from Erik Graf

Greg Warner is CEO and Founder of MarketSmart, a revolutionary marketing software and services firm that helps nonprofits raise more for less. In 2012 Greg coined the phrase “Engagement Fundraising” to encapsulate his breakthrough fundraising formula for achieving extraordinary results. Using their own innovative strategies and technologies, MarketSmart helps fundraisers around the world zero in on the donors most ready to support their organizations and institutions with major and legacy gifts.

In his recent post on The Social Graf, Erik Sass punches social media in the face a bit.  There are some interesting thoughts here although I think they only apply to Facebook and Twitter.  I think LinkedIn provides a lot of value— the social media option for grown ups.  Furthermore, I happen to like social media.  I feel more connected with friends I don’t see often and I use Twitter to find interesting news articles.

Anyway, although these points are watered down from his original post, here are his 9 reasons to quit social media:

1.  It’s a waste of time. I like Erik’s take on this.  Let’s face it… how much time is spent “goofing off” with social media and how much true value do you get from looking at posts your friends?

2.  It’s addictive and unhealthy. “If nothing else, countless hours might be better spent taking a walk, pursuing a hobby, or doing activities you enjoy outside,” says Erik.

3.  It encourages envy/narcissism. I think this one is self-explanatory.

4. It takes you away from the real world.

5. It encourages superficial relationships. How many “friends” do you have?  Now, how many “real friends” do you have that will help you move out of your apartment on a sunny Saturday?

6. Privacy concerns/unethical business practices. How much information do you really want Facebook to know about you, your friends, your interests and your debauchery?

7. It can be personally and professional dangerous. Same deal here?  How much do you want your friends or business associates to know about you?

8.  It’s expected. I object to this one because I don’t think anyone really expects you to have a profile on social media (except on LinkedIn).  Recently some folks have suggested that criminals and murderers are less likely to have Facebook profiles.  But I don’t think your absence means you should be profiled.

9.  It’s only going to get worse. Erik finishes his post by saying, “in short, if you think managing your social media presences is overwhelming now, just imagine what it will be like ten years from now. And ask yourself: is it really worth it?”

What do you think?

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