How to Forecast How Much Planned Giving Revenue You Will Get

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Greg Warner is CEO and Founder of MarketSmart, a revolutionary marketing software and services firm that helps nonprofits raise more for less. In 2012 Greg coined the phrase “Engagement Fundraising” to encapsulate his breakthrough fundraising formula for achieving extraordinary results. Using their own innovative strategies and technologies, MarketSmart helps fundraisers around the world zero in on the donors most ready to support their organizations and institutions with major and legacy gifts.

forecasting revenueI think Michael Rosen is the most thorough of all planned giving bloggers. If you find my posts to be too short and missing some meat, then you’ll really enjoy Michael’s exceptionally brilliant and complete analysis of just about everything related to planned gift fundraising.
In this recent post he examines how to forecast “what you might get.”
After reading it, I figured I’d sum up two ways I gleaned that you can forecast how much planned giving revenue you could get. Here you go:

1. Aggressive forecast – Look at the average bequest revenue received each year (calculated over the past five years) and add 10% – Use this if you feel your organization has been investing enough in planned gift marketing for at least the past 10 years

2. Conservative forecast – Look at the average bequest revenue received each year (calculated over the past five years) and subtract 10% – Use this if you feel your organization has not been investing enough in planned gift marketing for the past 10 years

NOTE: If you had an unusually large gift come in during the five year period, remove it from your calculation

For more on this subject, you really should take a look at Michael’s post.
Or you can use the calculator he and I created together. Try it here. It’s pretty simple.
 
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4 responses to “How to Forecast How Much Planned Giving Revenue You Will Get”

  1. Patrick Nugent says:

    The two forecasts are entirely identical except one says “add” and the other says “subtract.” (One says “at least 10 years” while the other says “10 years).Both are to be used if the organization has NOT been investing enough. Maybe there’s an extra NOT somewhere?

  2. Patrick Nugent says:

    The two forecasts are entirely identical except one says “add” and the other says “subtract.” (One says “at least 10 years” while the other says “10 years).Both are to be used if the organization has NOT been investing enough. Maybe there’s an extra NOT somewhere?

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