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Try this: PIZZA PARTY PLANNED GIVING!

Greg Warner is CEO and Founder of MarketSmart, a revolutionary marketing software and services firm that helps nonprofits raise more for less. In 2012 Greg coined the phrase “Engagement Fundraising” to encapsulate his breakthrough fundraising formula for achieving extraordinary results. Using their own innovative strategies and technologies, MarketSmart helps fundraisers around the world zero in on the donors most ready to support their organizations and institutions with major and legacy gifts.

have you tried pizza party planned giving?I once came up with this but, honestly, I have never tried it. It’s called PIZZA PARTY PLANNED GIVING.
Let me know if you think it will work. Here’s how to do it:
 
1– Invite a bunch of board members and volunteers to a pizza party
2– Order the pizza
3– While everyone waitings for the pizza, discuss how to make outbound calls to say “thank you” to donors (and I suggest you leave voicemail thank you messages too)
4– Give everyone a cheat sheet with bullet points that outline the following:

-Smile while waiting for the donor to pick up the phone and while talking

-Introduce yourself and immediately tell them that you are NOT calling to ask for money but, rather, you are just calling to say “thank you”

-Immediately ask questions such as:

  • I’m kind of curious, would you mind sharing with me why you decided to give to _______________?
  • Was there an influential person in your life who inspired you to be charitable toward ______________?
  • On a scale of 1 to 10 (10 being most important), how important is it to you that _____________ continues to do XYZ?
  • How would you feel and what would you think if I were calling to tell you that _____________ was closing its doors and would cease to exist?

5– Now, start calling
6– Say “thank you” then LISTEN to your donors… don’t talk much at all… just listen and ask the questions above
7– Before ending the conversation, say, “Oh, and one more thing…. Many people have found that leaving a gift in their will or estate plan to ______________ (especially to honor someone they care about) is a great way to make a very symbolic, meaningful impact— even after their lifetime. Is this something you have ever considered or would be willing to consider?”
8– Be sure the volunteers take notes so your fundraising team can follow-up as needed
9– Eat some pizza, share successes/stories, and count your leads (and uncovered gifts)
 
I’M SURE YOU WILL UNCOVER PLENTY OF “HIDDEN” GIFTS AND GENERATE TONS OF LEADS.  AND ALL IT WILL COST YOU IS A COUPLE OF PIZZAS!
 
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5 responses to “Try this: PIZZA PARTY PLANNED GIVING!”

  1. Claire Meyerhoff says:

    Wow, great idea. Wish i’d thought of it!

  2. Chris Luksha says:

    This is of course a great idea. My only concern is that you make the beak the most sacred of contributor development. You say “We are only here to say thank you” and then just when you are about to hang up you throw in a veiled ask.
    The minute you said “oh and one more thing” – you defeated the purpose of the thank you and started making an ask.
    I highly recommend you take step seven out of the mix completely. It destroys all trust in three words – “one more thing.”
    Blessings,
    Chris

    • Greg Warner says:

      Thanks Chris but I respectfully disagree.
      I think instead, the caller should only “ask” if it is appropriate (considering how the conversation goes).
      You are assuming that asking is bad and that donors do not want to give. I am assuming that asking is good and donors do want to give. Therefore, I see it as providing convenience by asking. You see it as dishonest.
      And by the way, I really don’t think this is an “ask” if you are only asking if people would consider this giving option. We are not asking for money. We are recommending they ask the prospect to consider this kind of giving opportunity to make their heart warmer.
      I hope you understand my point. Otherwise, just call it a thanking party… not Pizza Party Planned Giving.
      Thanking parties are a good idea too. But if you want to ensure your mission for generations to come, you really need to give your supporters the opportunity to consider making a huge impact with a legacy gift. Many would want to give in this way if they only knew it was a smart option. We owe it to them to give them that opportunity. And the best time to do that is right after we say “thank you.”

  3. Chris Luksha says:

    This is of course a great idea. My only concern is that you make the beak the most sacred of contributor development. You say “We are only here to say thank you” and then just when you are about to hang up you throw in a veiled ask.
    The minute you said “oh and one more thing” – you defeated the purpose of the thank you and started making an ask.
    I highly recommend you take step seven out of the mix completely. It destroys all trust in three words – “one more thing.”
    Blessings,
    Chris

    • Greg Warner says:

      Thanks Chris but I respectfully disagree.
      I think instead, the caller should only “ask” if it is appropriate (considering how the conversation goes).
      You are assuming that asking is bad and that donors do not want to give. I am assuming that asking is good and donors do want to give. Therefore, I see it as providing convenience by asking. You see it as dishonest.
      And by the way, I really don’t think this is an “ask” if you are only asking if people would consider this giving option. We are not asking for money. We are recommending they ask the prospect to consider this kind of giving opportunity to make their heart warmer.
      I hope you understand my point. Otherwise, just call it a thanking party… not Pizza Party Planned Giving.
      Thanking parties are a good idea too. But if you want to ensure your mission for generations to come, you really need to give your supporters the opportunity to consider making a huge impact with a legacy gift. Many would want to give in this way if they only knew it was a smart option. We owe it to them to give them that opportunity. And the best time to do that is right after we say “thank you.”

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