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Donor Retention

Greg Warner is CEO and Founder of MarketSmart, a revolutionary marketing software and services firm that helps nonprofits raise more for less. In 2012 Greg coined the phrase “Engagement Fundraising” to encapsulate his breakthrough fundraising formula for achieving extraordinary results. Using their own innovative strategies and technologies, MarketSmart helps fundraisers around the world zero in on the donors most ready to support their organizations and institutions with major and legacy gifts.

donor retentionI think we’re in trouble.
 
No, I’m not worried about the economy. It’s not the recent jobs report either.
 
I’m worried because the latest Nonprofit Communications Trends Report cites the #1 communication goal of nonprofit professionals as “acquiring new donors” while “retaining donors” is in a distant 4th place behind “engaging our community” and “general brand awareness”.
 
This is terrible because donor retention should be #1.  Everyone says so from Roger Craver (The Agitator) to Penelope Burk.
 
Learn how to crack the code for better donor retention today.
Fundraising retention in peril

4 responses to “Donor Retention”

  1. Mark says:

    Agreed. #s1 and 4 need to switch places. 80/20 rule totally applies here. We have noticed that many major donors and consistent and loyal several decade donors with children as a hot button, also served in the military, or lost a brother in Vietnam, etc. It is almost always easier to do more business with someone we already have an existing relationship, to deepen and widen the relationship, than to find and build a new relationship.
    In pursuing millenials, they want to engage first and give second. If we make engagement our first priority with them, we’ll get them as donors, but hearts have to come before heads and checkbooks. Also, brand awareness and clear communication will help them understand not just why and what, but so what (input, output and more importantly inpact) Lastly, carefully segmenting donors going forward is critical. Sure, we want new donors, everybody does–but it is the RIGHT new donors that are critical.
    No way #1 priority should be new donors.

  2. Mark says:

    Agreed. #s1 and 4 need to switch places. 80/20 rule totally applies here. We have noticed that many major donors and consistent and loyal several decade donors with children as a hot button, also served in the military, or lost a brother in Vietnam, etc. It is almost always easier to do more business with someone we already have an existing relationship, to deepen and widen the relationship, than to find and build a new relationship.
    In pursuing millenials, they want to engage first and give second. If we make engagement our first priority with them, we’ll get them as donors, but hearts have to come before heads and checkbooks. Also, brand awareness and clear communication will help them understand not just why and what, but so what (input, output and more importantly inpact) Lastly, carefully segmenting donors going forward is critical. Sure, we want new donors, everybody does–but it is the RIGHT new donors that are critical.
    No way #1 priority should be new donors.

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